IMG_3621.JPG

about

My name is Alex Gross ("Al" is fine, too; "Alexandra" professionally), and I'm the creator, editor, blogger, photographer, music collector, and curator behind this site. Welcome! I began this project in 2008 when I started to work on organic farms and was looking for a way to express a newfound interest in food production, food politics, a bounty of new recipes and all the comes along with immersing myself in the fair, just, good food world. Now, it's morphed into much more.

Since graduating from Fairfield University in 2009, I've been extremely fortunate to explore all areas of the food system and do what I love: surround myself with good food, good people and share. I worked as a freelance writer and continued to pursue my love of food growing by working on and managing small farms in Connecticut. 

In April 2014, I began working for Simply Smilesan incredible not-for-profit, and have spent lots of time living and working on the Cheyenne River Reservation in South Dakota developing sustainable food and garden projects that provide healthful food and cultivate personal, communal and cultural pride. I also hold my M.S. in Sustainable Food Systems from Green Mountain College, completing a capstone on Lakota foodways. 

Call it blissful optimism or millennial naiveity, but I want to this small place in the digital world to count and exist in a meaningful way, especially to help - and celebrate! - food growers, small business, and people doing good in the world.

My philosophy is simple: Far too many people don't have control over much in their lives; yet, food and creativity can be an exception. Food and creativity are incredibly powerful tools and resources for us to connect with ourselves, each other, our histories and serve as pathways to create a better, more resilient future.

 


I love food. I love small businesses and farms. I love creative, hardworking individuals. I want you to succeed. Here's how I can help:


Fun facts: I have two different colored eyes (blue and brown). I also got hypothermia while harvesting kale. These two facts are not related.